Saturday, September 27, 2008

Florida Bingo Laws

Florida Statutes Summary

1. 849.0931 f.s.

Abstract: (9) Every charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization involved in the conduct of a bingo game or instant bingo must be located in the county, or within a 15-mile radius of, where the bingo game or instant bingo is located. (10)(a) No one under 18 years of age shall be allowed to play any bingo game or instant bingo or be involved in the conduct of a bingo game or instant bingo in any way. 4. Have a form of winner protection that allows the organization to verify, after the instant bingo ...



Florida Statutes

The 2007 Florida Statutes


Title XLVI
CRIMES
Chapter 849
GAMBLING
View Entire Chapter
849.0931 Bingo authorized; conditions for conduct; permitted uses of proceeds; limitations.--

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Bingo game" means and refers to the activity, commonly known as "bingo," in which participants pay a sum of money for the use of one or more bingo cards. When the game commences, numbers are drawn by chance, one by one, and announced. The players cover or mark those numbers on the bingo cards which they have purchased until a player receives a given order of numbers in sequence that has been preannounced for that particular game. This player calls out "bingo" and is declared the winner of a predetermined prize. More than one game may be played upon a bingo card, and numbers called for one game may be used for a succeeding game or games.

(b) "Bingo card" means and refers to the flat piece of paper or thin pasteboard employed by players engaged in the game of bingo. The bingo card shall have not fewer than 24 playing numbers printed on it. These playing numbers shall range from 1 through 75, inclusive. More than one set of bingo numbers may be printed on any single piece of paper.

(c) "Charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization" means an organization which has qualified for exemption from federal income tax as an exempt organization under the provisions of s. 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 or s. 528 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended; which is engaged in charitable, civic, community, benevolent, religious, or scholastic works or other similar activities; and which has been in existence and active for a period of 3 years or more.

(d) "Deal" means a separate set or package of not more than 4,000 instant bingo tickets in which the predetermined minimum prize payout is at least 65 percent of the total receipts from the sale of the entire deal.

(e) "Flare" means the board or placard that accompanies each deal of instant bingo tickets and that has printed on or affixed to it the following information:

1. The game name.

2. The manufacturer's name or distinctive logo.

3. The form number.

4. The ticket count.

5. The prize structure, including the number of symbols or number combinations for winning instant bingo tickets by denomination, with their respective winning symbols or number combinations.

6. The cost per play.

7. The game serial number.

(f) "Instant bingo" means a form of bingo that is played at the same location as bingo, using tickets by which a player wins a prize by opening and removing a cover from the ticket to reveal a set of numbers, letters, objects, or patterns, some of which have been designated in advance as prize winners.

(g) "Objects" means a set of 75 balls or other precision shapes that are imprinted with letters and numbers in such a way that numbers 1 through 15 are marked with the letter "B," numbers 16 through 30 are marked with the letter "I," numbers 31 through 45 are marked with the letter "N," numbers 46 through 60 are marked with the letter "G," and numbers 61 through 75 are marked with the letter "O."

(h) "Rack" means the container in which the objects are placed after being drawn and announced.

(i) "Receptacle" means the container from which the objects are drawn or ejected.

(j) "Session" means a designated set of games played in a day or part of a day.

(2)(a) None of the provisions of this chapter shall be construed to prohibit or prevent charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organizations engaged in charitable, civic, community, benevolent, religious, or scholastic works or other similar endeavors, which organizations have been in existence and active for a period of 3 years or more, from conducting bingo games or instant bingo, provided the entire proceeds derived from the conduct of such games, less actual business expenses for articles designed for and essential to the operation, conduct, and playing of bingo or instant bingo, are donated by such organizations to the endeavors mentioned above. In no case may the net proceeds from the conduct of such games be used for any other purpose whatsoever. The proceeds derived from the conduct of bingo games or instant bingo shall not be considered solicitation of public donations.

(b) It is the express intent of the Legislature that no charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization serve as a sponsor of a bingo game or instant bingo conducted by another, but such organization may only be directly involved in the conduct of such a game as provided in this act.

(3) If an organization is not engaged in efforts of the type set out above, its right to conduct bingo games hereunder is conditioned upon the return of all the proceeds from such games to the players in the form of prizes. If at the conclusion of play on any day during which a bingo game is allowed to be played under this section there remain proceeds which have not been paid out as prizes, the organization conducting the game shall at the next scheduled day of play conduct bingo games without any charge to the players and shall continue to do so until the proceeds carried over from the previous days played have been exhausted. This provision in no way extends the limitation on the number of prize or jackpot games allowed in one day as provided for in subsection (5).

(4) The right of a condominium association, a cooperative association, a homeowners' association as defined in s. 720.301, a mobile home owners' association, a group of residents of a mobile home park as defined in chapter 723, or a group of residents of a mobile home park or recreational vehicle park as defined in chapter 513 to conduct bingo is conditioned upon the return of the net proceeds from such games to players in the form of prizes after having deducted the actual business expenses for such games for articles designed for and essential to the operation, conduct, and playing of bingo. Any net proceeds remaining after paying prizes may be donated by the association to a charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization which is exempt from federal income tax under the provisions of s. 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code to be used in such recipient organization's charitable, civic, community, benevolent, religious, or scholastic works or similar activities or, in the alternative, such remaining proceeds shall be used as specified in subsection (3).

(5) Except for instant bingo prizes, which are limited to the amounts displayed on the ticket or on the game flare, a jackpot shall not exceed the value of $250 in actual money or its equivalent, and there shall be no more than three jackpots in any one session of bingo.

(6) Except for instant bingo, which is not limited by this subsection, the number of days per week during which organizations authorized under this section may conduct bingo shall not exceed two.

(7) Except for instant bingo prizes, which are limited to the amounts displayed on the ticket or on the game flare, there shall be no more than three jackpots on any one day of play. All other game prizes shall not exceed $50.

(8) Each person involved in the conduct of any bingo game or instant bingo must be a resident of the community where the organization is located and a bona fide member of the organization sponsoring such game and may not be compensated in any way for operation of such game. When bingo games or instant bingo is conducted by a charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization, the organization conducting the games must designate up to three members of that organization to be in charge of the games, one of whom shall be present during the entire session at which the games are conducted. The organization conducting the games is responsible for posting a notice, which notice states the name of the organization and the designated member or members, in a conspicuous place on the premises at which the session is held or instant bingo is played. A caller in a bingo game may not be a participant in that bingo game.

(9) Every charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization involved in the conduct of a bingo game or instant bingo must be located in the county, or within a 15-mile radius of, where the bingo game or instant bingo is located.

(10)(a) No one under 18 years of age shall be allowed to play any bingo game or instant bingo or be involved in the conduct of a bingo game or instant bingo in any way.

(b) Any organization conducting bingo open to the public may refuse entry to any person who is objectionable or undesirable to the sponsoring organization, but such refusal of entry shall not be on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, or physical handicap.

(11) Bingo games or instant bingo may be held only on the following premises:

(a) Property owned by the charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization.

(b) Property owned by the charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization that will benefit by the proceeds.

(c) Property leased for a period of not less than 1 year by a charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organization, providing the lease or rental agreement does not provide for the payment of a percentage of the proceeds generated at such premises to the lessor or any other party and providing the rental rate for such premises does not exceed the rental rates charged for similar premises in the same locale.

(d) Property owned by a municipality or a county when the governing authority has, by appropriate ordinance or resolution, specifically authorized the use of such property for the conduct of such games.

(e) With respect to bingo games conducted by a condominium association, a cooperative association, a homeowners' association as defined in s. 720.301, a mobile home owners' association, a group of residents of a mobile home park as defined in chapter 723, or a group of residents of a mobile home park or recreational vehicle park as defined in chapter 513, property owned by the association, property owned by the residents of the mobile home park or recreational vehicle park, or property which is a common area located within the condominium, mobile home park, or recreational vehicle park.

(12) Each bingo game shall be conducted in accordance with the following rules:

(a) The objects, whether drawn or ejected, shall be essentially equal as to size, shape, weight, and balance and as to all other characteristics that may control their selection from the receptacle. The caller shall cancel any game if, during the course of a game, the mechanism used in the drawing or ejection of objects becomes jammed in such a manner as to interfere with the accurate determination of the next number to be announced or if the caller determines that more than one object is labeled with the same number or that there is a number to be drawn without a corresponding object. Any player in a game canceled pursuant to this paragraph shall be permitted to play the next game free of charge.

(b) Prior to commencement of any bingo session, the member in charge shall cause a verification to be made of all objects to be placed in the receptacle and shall inspect the objects in the presence of a disinterested person to ensure that all objects are present and that there are no duplications or omissions of numbers on the objects. Any player shall be entitled to call for a verification of numbers before, during, and after a session.

(c) The card or sheet on which the game is played shall be part of a deck, group, or series, no two of which may be alike in any given game.

(d) All numbers shall be visibly displayed after being drawn and before being placed in the rack.

(e) A bona fide bingo shall consist of a predesignated arrangement of numbers on a card or sheet that correspond with the numbers on the objects drawn from the receptacle and announced. Errors in numbers announced or misplaced in the rack may not be recognized as a bingo.

(f) When a caller has started to vocally announce a number, the caller shall complete the call. If any player has obtained a bingo on a previous number, such player will share the prize with the player who gained bingo on the last number called.

(g) Numbers on the winning cards or sheets shall be announced and verified in the presence of another player. Any player shall be entitled at the time the winner is determined to call for a verification of numbers drawn. The verification shall be in the presence of the member designated to be in charge of the occasion or, if such person is also the caller, in the presence of an officer of the licensee.

(h) Upon determining a winner, the caller shall ask, "Are there any other winners?" If no one replies, the caller shall declare the game closed. No other player is entitled to share the prize unless she or he has declared a bingo prior to this announcement.

(i) Seats may not be held or reserved by an organization or person involved in the conduct of any bingo game for players not present, nor may any cards be set aside, held, or reserved from one session to another for any player.

(13)(a) Instant bingo tickets must be sold at the price printed on the ticket or on the game flare by the manufacturer, not to exceed $1. Discounts may not be given for the purchase of multiple tickets, nor may tickets be given away free of charge.

(b) Each deal of instant bingo tickets must be accompanied by a flare, and the flare must be posted before the sale of any tickets in that deal.

(c) Each instant bingo ticket in a deal must bear the same serial number, and there may not be more than one serial number in each deal. Serial numbers printed on a deal of instant bingo tickets may not be repeated by the manufacturer on the same form for a period of 3 years.

(d) The serial number for each deal must be clearly and legibly placed on the outside of each deal's package, box, or other container.

(e) Instant bingo tickets manufactured, sold, or distributed in this state must comply with the applicable standards on pull-tabs of the North American Gaming Regulators Association, as amended.

(f) Except as provided under paragraph (e), an instant bingo ticket manufactured, sold, or distributed in this state must:

1. Be manufactured so that it is not possible to identify whether it is a winning or losing instant bingo ticket until it has been opened by the player as intended.

2. Be manufactured using at least a two-ply paper stock construction so that the instant bingo ticket is opaque.

3. Have the form number, the deal's serial number, and the name or logo of the manufacturer conspicuously printed on the face or cover of the instant bingo ticket.

4. Have a form of winner protection that allows the organization to verify, after the instant bingo ticket has been played, that the winning instant bingo ticket presented for payment is an authentic winning instant bingo ticket for the deal in play. The manufacturer shall provide a written description of the winner protection with each deal of instant bingo tickets.

(g) Each manufacturer and distributor that sells or distributes instant bingo tickets in this state to charitable, nonprofit, or veterans' organizations shall prepare an invoice that contains the following information:

1. Date of sale.

2. Form number and serial number of each deal sold.

3. Number of instant bingo tickets in each deal sold.

4. Name of distributor or organization to whom each deal is sold.

5. Price of each deal sold.

All information contained on an invoice must be maintained by the distributor or manufacturer for 3 years.

(h) The invoice, or a true and accurate copy thereof, must be on the premises where any deal of instant bingo tickets is stored or in play.

(14) Any organization or other person who willfully and knowingly violates any provision of this section commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. For a second or subsequent offense, the organization or other person commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084.

History.--ss. 1, 6, ch. 92-280; s. 1, ch. 93-160; s. 1, ch. 94-326; s. 1363, ch. 97-102; s. 13, ch. 99-382; ss. 59, 70, ch. 2000-258; ss. 27, 28, ch. 2001-64; s. 2, ch. 2007-228.

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WTO Deems Internet Gambling Legal in US

But US refuses to comply and is subject to 21 million in sanctions @ year by Antigua

Summaries of the Case by Antigua's Counsel, Mark Mendel

Summary as of November 2007


Antigua - United States WTO Internet Gambling Case

"United States — Measures Affecting the Cross-Border Supply of Gambling and Betting Services" (WT/DS285)

Background. In March 2003, the government of Antigua and Barbuda ("Antigua") commenced the dispute resolution process of the World Trade Organization ("WTO") to challenge the United States' total prohibition of cross-border gambling services offered by Antiguan operators such as the World Sports Exchange to consumers in the United States ("US"). For several months, Antigua went through a pre-dispute negotiation process with the US in an effort to resolve the trade dispute. In June 2003, after the United States refused to engage in meaningful negotiations, Antigua asked the WTO to form a three-judge panel ("Dispute Panel") to resolve the dispute.

The First Round (2003-2004): The Dispute Panel Rules in Favor of Antigua: On March 24, 2004, the WTO Dispute Panel issued a confidential ruling in favor of Antigua, finding that the US restrictions against online gambling violated international treaties. The Dispute Panel Report ruling was a smashing victory for Antigua, which maintained all along that its sportsbooks and casinos were lawful businesses which were entitled to access the huge US gambling market. The WTO ruling took the gambling world by storm because it moved the possibility of fully and clearly legal online gambling closer to reality in the US and elsewhere.

Following the Dispute Panel's confidential ruling (the "Panel Report"), Antigua and the US again attempted to negotiate a resolution to their trade dispute. Although Antigua was ready and willing to negotiate, the US did not make any material offers or concessions to Antigua and the negotiations quickly broke down. The US simply maintained that federal law totally prohibited all betting and gambling services that could be offered from Antigua to the US. On November 10, 2004, with negotiations having failed, the WTO released the Panel Report in favor of Antigua.

The Second Round (2004-2005): US Appeal to the Appellate Body is Denied.
On January 7, 2005, the US appealed the Panel Report to the WTO's Appellate Body. Antigua proceeded to file its own cross-appeal on a number of technical grounds. Over the course of the next two months, the US and Antigua filed their respective submissions to the Appellate Body. The two countries then presented oral arguments to the Appellate Body on February 21, 2005. On April 7, 2005, the WTO issued the Report of the Appellate Body in this matter. The Report of the Appellate Body upholds the Dispute Panel's Final Report, although on slightly different and narrower grounds. In its report, the Appellate Body made four key rulings:

First, the Appellate Body ruled that the US had made a commitment to free trade in betting and gambling services in its schedule of commitments to the General Agreement on Trade in Services ("GATS"). The US had contended throughout the dispute that it had not made such a "commitment." The Appellate Body disagreed, holding that the commitment was made in Section 10.D of the US's GATS Schedule, under the heading "Other Recreational Services (Excluding Sporting)."

Second, the Appellate Body ruled that the US had adopted "measures" that interfered with its obligation to provide free trade in betting and gambling services with Antigua. Specifically, the Appellate Body ruled that Antigua established the existence of three federal laws which prohibited Antigua's gambling services: (1) the Wire Act of 1961, 18 U.S.C. §1084 ("Wire Act"); (2) the Travel Act, 18 U.S.C. §1952 ("Travel Act"); and the Illegal, 18 U.S.C. §1955 ("IGBA"). Antigua had sought to have more federal and state laws considered "measures" that violate the US's GATS commitment. Antigua listed a large number of other federal and state laws that it contended were measures in this case. Antigua also contended that the US maintained a "total prohibition" against the supply of gambling services from Antigua, and that this "total prohibition" was itself a measure. The Appellate Body disagreed with these additional arguments, finding that the other list of federal and state laws were not discussed in sufficient detail by Antigua in its submissions and that a "total prohibition" cannot serve as a measure by itself. The Appellate Body limited the offending "measures" in this matter to the three federal statutes listed above.

Third, the Appellate Body found that the "measures" established by Antigua - the three federal statutes - violated Article XVI of the GATS. Specifically, the Appellate Body found that the US prohibition limits service providers from Antigua in such a way as to violate Article XVI of the GATS.

Fourth, the Appellate Body found that the US could not invoke a "moral defense" to its violation of the GATS. Under Article XIV of the GATS, a country can violate the terms of the free trade treaty if the violation is necessary to protect "public morals" or maintain the "public order." In order to establish its so-called morals defense, the US was required to meet a two-part test: (1) prove that the three federal statutes were necessary to protect public morals or maintain public order and (2) satisfy a legal balancing test, referred to as the "chapeau." With respect to the first element of this morals defense, the Appellate Body determined, over Antigua's objections, that the three federal statutes were necessary to protect public morals or maintain public order. With respect to the second element of this defense, the Appellate Body ruled that the US did not establish the chapeau. The Dispute Panel had found several reasons why the US could not meet the chapeau. The Appellate Body disagreed with the Dispute Panel's reasoning, but nevertheless ruled that the US could not establish the chapeau because the US either sanctioned or permitted "remote gambling" in the US, primarily in the form of off-track account wagering on horse races. The Appellate Body noted that there were several companies in the US that provided telephone and Internet betting services on horse races. These companies were sanctioned to provide these services by the Interstate Horseracing Act ("IHA"). The Appellate Body concluded that the US could not justify why it permitted US-based companies to offer remote gambling in the form of telephone and Internet account wagering while the US prohibited Antiguan companies from offering the same type of gambling services. By making this finding, the Appellate Body held that the US could not prevail on its morals defense - technically known as its Article XIV defense.

Whereas the Dispute Panel Report was a clear defeat for the US, the Appellate Body's ruling was ambiguous in a number of material respects. Antigua immediately hailed the decision as a confirmation of its original victory, but conceded that the language of the report probably meant that the US could bring itself into compliance with the GATS in one of two ways - either by (i) allowing Antiguan operators access to the US market or (ii) prohibiting all forms of remote gambling in the US-whether domestic or foreign and whether intrastate or cross-border. The US jumped upon the lack of coherency of the Appellate Body decision to itself claim victory in the matter, publicly asserting that the WTO had held the US entitled to maintain the illegal laws under the "morals defense", but that it just had to "tweak" the IHA to make things somehow "clear". The indecisiveness and ambiguity of the Appellate Body's report combined with the desire of the US to claim victory led to much confusion as to what the decision really meant. It took some time before Antigua's interpretation of the decision was confirmed correct - but it was.

The Third Round (2005): Arbitration Over the Amount of Time for the US to Comply with the Appellate Body's Ruling. Under WTO rules, the US had a "reasonable period of time" to correct its offending laws. The parties were unable to agree on what the period should be and so under the rules had to request arbitration to set the compliance period. In 2005, the Arbitrator issued a ruling in which he gave the US a little less than a year to comply, and this period passed on April 3, 2006 without any laws being adopted by the US to implement the rulings.

After the compliance period passed, the US submitted a status report to the WTO, saying that it was in compliance with the prior rulings based solely upon a statement of the US Department of Justice in which it said it "views the existing criminal statutes as prohibiting the interstate transmission of bets or wagers, including wagers on horse races. The Department is currently undertaking a civil investigation relating to a potential violation of law regarding this activity. We have previously stated that we do not believe that the Interstate Horse Racing Act . . . amended the existing criminal statutes."

The US further told the WTO "in view of these circumstances, the US is in compliance with the recommendations and rulings of the [WTO] in this dispute." Antigua expressed its disagreement with the US' claim, noting that the quoted statement was just a restatement of one of the arguments made by the US to the panel and the Appellate Body during the course of the original proceedings.

The Fourth Round (2006-2007): WTO Compliance Panel Finds the US Has Failed to Comply. In June 2006 Antigua again sought recourse under WTO rules by requesting consultations with the US over the US's failure to comply with the original rulings. Again, these consultations did not result in agreement so on July 6, 2006, Antigua requested the establishment of yet another WTO panel to resolve this latest disagreement. In this next round of proceedings, Antigua advanced the straightforward argument that since the US had done nothing at all to come into compliance with the rulings, it could not, therefore, be in compliance. The US returned with the incredible claim that it actually was in compliance, and that what the WTO had really asked of the US was for it to convince this new "compliance" panel that the three laws were not in fact "disguised restrictions on trade" so that the US would, in its view, thus be entitled to the "morals defense" after all. In its report, issue March 2007, the Compliance Panel made three major findings in favor of Antigua:

The US had taken no action to comply with the rulings and thus remained out of compliance;
The US was not entitled in to reargue the case that failed before the first panel and the Appellate Body; and
Even assuming that the US was entitled to reargue its failed case, based upon the evidence presented the US "morals defense" case would still fail.
As a result of the Compliance Panel decision Antigua became entitled to impose trade sanctions against the US to "encourage" the US to meet its international trade obligations to Antigua. The Compliance Panel decision also made it impossible for the US to continue to maintain the pretense that it had somehow "won" the dispute or that the WTO had ruled that the US was entitled to prohibit the provision of remote gambling services from Antigua.

The Fifth Round (2007): The United States Attempts to Withdraw Its Gambling Commitment, But the Process Remains In Doubt. In the face of this clear and comprehensive victory for Antigua, rather than deciding to come into compliance with the rulings or to settle with Antigua, the US took the unprecedented step of declaring that it was going to withdraw the original commitment to allow the cross-border provision of gambling and betting services that had resulted in the adverse rulings in the first place. While there is a provision of the GATS that allows the withdrawal of a commitment, it has never before been used as a means of settling an adverse WTO ruling.

Under WTO rules, before the US can withdraw the commitment, it must find means of compensating "any affected" WTO members as a result of the withdrawal of the commitment. If the parties cannot agree on the "compensation", then there is a procedure for arbitration of any dispute in that context. As this provision has never been used before, and never taken to arbitration, immense uncertainty exists as to what kind of "compensation" or "compensatory adjustments" complaining members are entitled to. As a result of the US announcement, in addition to Antigua, the EU, Costa Rica, Canada, Macau, Canada and Australia filed claims for compensation with the US. As of today, all of these countries, including Antigua, continue negotiating with the US over this issue. It must be said that the considerable uncertainty surrounding the proposed withdrawal continues and it is virtually impossible to predict how this will play out in the coming months.

The Sixth Round (2007): Trade Sanctions Against the US Heard by Arbitration Panel, As Antigua is Entitled to the "Suspension of Concessions or Other Obligations." Antigua has submitted a request to level concessions against the US - to offset the economic effect of the continuing failure of the US to comply with the rulings and allow Antiguan operators access to American consumers. In determining what concessions to impose, Antigua is entitled to ensure that they be a "practical and effective" way of inducing US compliance. Antigua has requested approval to achieve its concessions by suspending up to $3.4 billion annually in intellectual property rights with respect to American copyrighted and trademarked products under the WTO's intellectual property rights agreement, or "TRIPS". A decision by the Arbitrators is anticipated by the end of November 2007.

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Big Cat Bingo Gambling Disclaimer

By accessing the Big Cat Bingo site or becoming a member of Big Cat Bingo, you are agreeing to the following terms and any other terms or conditions that management may see fit to impose from time to time.

Big Cat Bingo accepts no responsibility or liability for any losses which may be incurred by any person or persons using the whole or part of the contents of the information, systems, plans, methods, competitions and games contained herein and made available on this site. Use the information provided on the Big Cat Bingo site at your own risk.

Although Big Cat Bingo may recommend an online casino or other Internet site or business, we accept no responsibility for anything which may or may not occur through any dealings you have with those other sites. It is your responsibility to satisfy yourself that all businesses you deal with have a good reputation and will honor their word and promises.

No gambling occurs on the Big Cat Bingo Website. Big Cat Bingo is not a casino. Big Cat Bingo games are provided on an 'as is basis' and may be played for free for fun purposes by registered members. Game sponsors do impose terms or restrictions on the eligibility to claim some prizes. Members who do not meet the eligibility requirements to claim a prize should consider the prize void. Prizes are not redeemable for cash or other prizes. Big Cat Bingo reserves the right to refuse to award any prize to any person without giving any reason whatsoever.

Big Cat Bingo does not promote or encourage illegal or underage gambling, or gambling to persons who reside in jurisdictions where gambling is considered unlawful. In those instances, this site is presented for informational and entertainment purposes only. By entering Big Cat Bingo you agree that you are aware of the terms outlined herein and reside in an area where it is not unlawful to gamble online.

Big Cat Bingo reserves the right to ban any person from membership for any reason deemed appropriate by management of Big Cat Bingo. In the event of a ban, the decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. People who have been banned from Big Cat Bingo or the casinos Big Cat Bingo deals with are excluded from signing up for new membership or playing any games or claiming prizes on the Big Cat Bingo site.

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

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